The Deeplink Debrief - July 23

We rounded up the latest industry news, highlights and announcements in mobile engagement and deep linking to bring you the top articles to read this week:

1. At this year’s MobileBeat conference, Liron Shapira from Quixey, Ilya Sukhar from Parse (Facebook), and John Milinovich from URX discussed deep links and their implications for the mobile ecosystem.

Read URX’s recap and Quixey’s recap of the deep linking discussion.

There was broad agreement that implementing deep links is a no-brainer as it improves the mobile experience for everyone. Industry adoption, while still limited to about 1 in 5 for the top apps today, is growing quickly as Apple, Facebook, and Google are all pushing implementations that fit their platforms. The panel focused on implications of deep linking – what happens after apps can communicate with each other? —URX Blog

2. During its quarterly earnings call, Google revealed that it is aggressively pursuing app indexing. The app indexing tool, announced at the end of last quarter, helps developers engage users who have already downloaded their app.

Read URX's take on why Google needs to promote App Index Adoption.

Not only are apps the primary access point on mobile, they will likely be even more important for wearables and other connected devices. Without App Indexing, Google cannot see the content inside apps and therefore cannot provide relevant search results. Longer term, this threatens search as the primary content discovery method on mobile and could jeopardize Google’s cash cow. —URX Blog

3. The URX team analyzed the deep link meta tag adoption rates for Twitter, Google & Facebook tags and found that Twitter’s tags have the highest adoption rates.

Among the top mobile apps with deep link tags, Twitter Card tags are the most popular: 70% use Twitter tags, 47% use Google tags, and only 29% use Facebook’s App Links tags. URX Blog

4. VentureBeat compares the mobile app world to a web without URLs, and discusses mobile strategy with Joff Redfern of LinkedIn, which has 6 different apps and is developing a way to deep link from one of its apps to another.

Suppose your company has several different apps for different purposes, and you want to send a customer from one app to a specific screen within another app – without making them log in a second time. Right now, that requires building your own custom cross-linking library, says LinkedIn vice president of mobile Joff Redfern. —VentureBeat

5. Stealth start-up Relcy is building a page–rank style mobile search engine to find and link to information within apps.

For a user this means, one single search bar or entry point, to seamlessly search and browse through the content inside apps (like they do on the web) – and going straight into the specific results inside apps. —TechCrunch

6. According to recent data from Nielsen, people in the U.S. are spending more time in apps, but most do not use more than 30 apps.

Including all age groups, people spent 65% more time each month using apps than they did two years ago, Nielsen said. But the average number of apps they used each month increased slightly to 26.8 from 26.5 a year earlier and 23.2 two years earlier. —Wall Street Journal

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Why Google is Desperate for App Index Adoption

Why Google is Desperate for App Index Adoption

I was shocked to hear Nikesh Arora, Google’s Chief Business Officer, mention App Indexing on the Google Earnings call on Thursday. These calls are carefully scripted for the financial community to communicate quarterly results and mention progress in other core areas of the business. App Indexing enables Android app developers to expose their deep link structure to Google. This means that Google can then index the content inside apps and provide app results alongside web results in search. The fact that a developer initiative that only fully launched last month at I/O was highlighted reflects how incredibly important App Indexing is to Google. Here's why.

 

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Engaging Your App Users Through Twitter, Google and Facebook

Engaging Your App Users Through Twitter, Google and Facebook

Twitter, Google and Facebook each have website tags for integrating content from mobile apps into their core services: cards for Twitter, referral traffic from Facebook, and search results for Google.

We took a closer look at how Twitter, Google and Facebook are using these tags to create a better experience for app users. 

Publishing your app’s deeplink tags on your website is as simple as adding a few lines of code and it enables you to send more traffic directly into your app. 

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7 Years of Mobile Evolution: Themes from #Mobilebeat

I’ve attended several Mobilebeat conferences over the years and was struck this last week how times have changed. What was discussed: context, on-app commerce, re-engagement, attribution, personalization, and contextual commerce.  What wasn’t: iOS or Android, tablet vs mobile, role of the carriers, top schemes to get the top of the App Store.  

I took a quick trip down memory lane and looked through the key topics of Mobilebeats past, and remembered how far we’ve come in the 7 years since the iPhone.

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Twitter's Deeplink Tags Have Higher Adoption than Google's or App Links

Twitter's Deeplink Tags Have Higher Adoption than Google's or App Links

We recently found that only 22% of the top 200 mobile apps use deeplink header tags on their websites. Companies include this HTML metadata on web pages so that mobile users visiting a page automatically experience the content in the app rather than the mobile browser.

As Facebook, Google, and Twitter have proposed their own deeplinking standards, the developer community has been asking us: which company’s tags are most widely adopted?

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#Mobilebeat: How Deeplinking will Shape the Future of Mobile

#Mobilebeat: How Deeplinking will Shape the Future of Mobile

Today at Mobilebeat, Liron Shapira from Quixey, Ilya Sukhar from Parse (Facebook), and John Milinovich from URX discussed deeplinks and their implications for the mobile ecosystem.

Not surprisingly, there was broad agreement that implementing deeplinks is a no brainer as it improves the mobile experience for everyone.  Industry adoption, while still limited to about 1 in 5 top apps today, is growing quickly as Apple, Facebook, and Google are all pushing implementations that fit their platforms. The panel focused on implications of deeplinking - what happens after apps can communicate with each other?

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The Deeplink Debrief - July 8

We rounded up the latest industry news, highlights and announcements in mobile engagement and deeplinking to bring you the top articles to read this week:

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How Many of the Top 200 Mobile Apps Use Deeplinks?

How Many of the Top 200 Mobile Apps Use Deeplinks?

We are entering a “mobile first” world where our everyday decisions take place on mobile devices. In fact, almost 90% of the time we spend on mobile is in applications: discovering a cafe on Yelp, listening to Spotify, buying on eBay, reading Bleacher Report, or watching Hulu.

These leading apps are part of a group of trendsetting companies that have both added deeplinks to their apps and added deeplink header tags to their corresponding websites. This is an important distinction: adding deeplinks to a mobile app enables a company to link into specific pages in the app, while adding the proper deeplink tags to websites informs everyone how to link into that app.

In an analysis of the top 200 mobile apps on the Android and iOS app store charts, we found that only 22% of apps have added these deeplink tags to their websites for at least one operating platform. We exclude mobile-only apps like Snapchat or Uber. Companies that have added tags for all three platforms (Android, iPhone, and iPad) comprise just 8% of the top 200.

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Why Twitter Just Bought a Deeplinking Company

Twitter bought TapCommerce today with a price tag of $100 million according to Re/code. TapCommerce is a mobile advertising company that helps companies retarget their users inside mobile apps.  In ad speak, they are a demand-side platform that helps clients programmatically buy targeted ads across a variety of ad exchanges

Twitter is building a full-stack advertising platform to compete against Facebook and Google for mobile ad dollars.  Facebook is racing to extend its powerful personalized targeting outside of Facebook itself, and Google has the huge advantage of the dominant share of search and the Doubleclick assets on the web.  Mobile app installs, and increasingly retargeting users, is where the mobile money is now and the race is on to provide comprehensive solutions to advertisers.

So how does deeplinking fit in?

 

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